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Topic: Scandals--Frauds--Criminals--Gangsters  (Read 2108 times)

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Offline ProfessorSlot

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Re: Scandals--Frauds--Criminals--Gangsters
« Reply #15 on: December 17, 2016, 08:28:47 am »
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  • Well casino has been a place for some of those criminals. Have you read at the internet that a casino somewhere in Asia used  to be participated on the stolen money of Bangladesh. Hackers wired the money all the way to that casino.


    Offline alrelax

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    Re: Scandals--Frauds--Criminals--Gangsters
    « Reply #16 on: December 17, 2016, 10:42:36 am »
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  • Well casino has been a place for some of those criminals. Have you read at the internet that a casino somewhere in Asia used  to be participated on the stolen money of Bangladesh. Hackers wired the money all the way to that casino.

    Yes I did, I will post it next, thanks.

    Offline alrelax

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    Re: Scandals--Frauds--Criminals--Gangsters
    « Reply #17 on: December 17, 2016, 10:47:28 am »
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  • Post #15:

    Read into this one, you will be amazed--Really!

    Bangladesh to Retrieve $15 Million from Fed Bank Cyber Heist

    First Published: November 09, 2016

    Bangladesh to Retrieve Kim Wong’s $15 Million
    Kim Wong testifying at a Philippine Senate hearing on the Federal Reserve heist. (Image: BD News)

    The Bangladesh Bank will retrieve $15 million of the $81 million stolen earlier this year in a daring cyber heist on the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

    On February 5th, hackers flooded the Fed Bank with requests for transfers totaling almost $1 billion from an account owned by the Bangladesh Bank and used by the government of Bangladesh.

    Around $101 million was successfully withdrawn before suspicions were raised. Some $20 million of this sum was quickly traced to Sri Lanka and recovered.

    The rest was transferred to Philippine bank RCBC and from there $46 million found its way into the lightly regulated Philippine casino industry and disappeared.

    Much remains uncovered. But according to Reuters, representatives from Bangladesh Bank have travelled to Manila to oversee the transfer of $15 million that ended up in the hands of casino boss Kim Wong, president of the Eastern Hawaii Casino in the Cagayan Economic Zone.

    You Got the Wong Guy

    Wong was initially fingered as the mastermind of the operation, but voluntarily gave testimony at a Philippine Senate hearing in March where he proclaimed his innocence and offered to return the money.

    He said the funds had been given to him by two high-rolling junket agents named Gao Shuhua and Ding Zhize, who owed him $10 million. They paid their debt and the remaining $5 million was converted into casino chips for the men’s high VIP clients.

    When asked why he hadn’t asked where the money came from, he said, “You don’t ask, it’s disrespectful.”

    Perpetrators Remain a Mystery

    The recovered $15 million is currently sitting in the vaults of the Philippine Central Bank and is ready to be transferred, having been ruled last to be the rightful property of Bangladesh by a Philippine court.

    “The writ of execution that the money be handed back to Bangladesh has already been done by the court,” John Gomes, Bangladesh’s ambassador to the Philippines, told Reuters. “The good thing is now that the process on this $15 million is more or less completed, we will go for the rest.”

    The problem is, the rest has largely disappeared into the ether. In March, Bangladeshi police said they had identified 20 individuals they suspected of having involvement in the heist, eight Filipinos and 12 Sri Lankans, but seven months later there have been no arrests.

    Casinos in the Philippines are not beholden to anti-money laundering laws, which makes the funds difficult to trace. The incident has provoked calls inside the country for tighter regulation of the industry.

    Offline alrelax

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    Re: Scandals--Frauds--Criminals--Gangsters
    « Reply #18 on: December 17, 2016, 10:54:50 am »
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  • Post #16:

    More on the Banglesdash hacked money @ casinos:

    Philippines Casino Executive Charged with Money Laundering in New York Fed Reserve Bank Cyber Heist

    First Published: March 25, 2016

    Kim Wong Federal Reserve Bank of New York cyber heist
    Philippines casino scandal: Kim Wong, president of the Philippines-based Eastern Hawaii Casino, is charged with money laundering millions of dollars stolen in the Fed Bank cyber heist.

    A top-ranking Philippines casino executive is facing money laundering charges for his alleged role in February’s $80 million cyber heist on the Federal Reserve Bank of New York.

    On February 5, computer hackers flooded the Fed with requests to transfer almost $1 billion from an account used by the Bangladeshi Central Bank for international settlements into various accounts around the world.

    Only four of these requests were actually processed before the scheme was recognized, and some $81 million was transferred into accounts at Filipino bank RCBC.

    From there, $46 million was laundered through the  minimally regulated Philippines casino industry, specifically via Bloomberry Resorts’ Solaire Resort and Casino in Manila, and the Eastern Hawaii Casino and Resort in the Cagayan Economic Zone.

    Top Executives Implicated

    This week, Filipino authorities filed criminal complaints against Eastern Hawaii Casino President Kim Wong, as well as Chinese junket operator Weikang Xu. Wong is accused of withdrawing around $21.6 million of the funds from his personal and corporate accounts.

    Meanwhile, Xu reportedly received $30 million from one of the RCBC accounts, of which he passed $29 million to Solaire.

    Wong, who is understood to be “abroad,” has said that he is “ready and willing” to return to the Philippines to offer his testimony.

    “It is our impression that some very powerful people are afraid of what our client will disclose, that’s why a premature case was filed against him,” Wong’s lawyer Victor Fernandez said this week. “They probably think that filing the case will deter our client from coming home and testifying before the Senate. They are wrong,” he said.

    But Philippines Senator Sergio Osmeña III believes that Wong is the “missing link” in the case.

    “There is an orchestrator here, a mastermind, and right now, it looks like it’s Kim Wong,” Osmeña told reporters. “But we have to give him a chance and let him come back from his trip abroad to testify before the committee.

    “He’s a big player in this,” the senator added.

     Calls for Reform

    Also under scrutiny is RCBC manager Maia Santos-Deguito, who allegedly failed to stop payments coming from the New York bank, and in fact proceeded to approve the fund transfer to casinos, despite the stop payments notice from the Federal Reserve. Deguito claims that Wong personally asked her to open the RCBC accounts through which the money passed, using fictitious names.

    She also claimed that she processed the transactions because her family had been threatened, although she later retracted this statement at a hearing of the Philippines Senate.

    The scandal has increased calls for reforms to the country’s banking and casino industries, which, unlike many elsewhere, are under little obligation to report suspicious patterns, or transactions over a certain threshold, in the name of customer privacy

    Offline alrelax

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    Re: Scandals--Frauds--Criminals--Gangsters
    « Reply #19 on: December 17, 2016, 11:00:03 am »
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  • Post #17:

    More on the Bangladesh hacking and funds transfers:

    New York Federal Reserve Deflects Responsibility for $100 Million Cyber Heist, But Were Casinos Money Launderers?

    First Publish: March 09, 2016

    The New York Federal Reserve says it was involved in no wrongdoing in what appears to be a successful $100 million cyber heist last month.

    New York Federal Reserve $100M heist

    Good as gold: Although thieves never even stepped foot in the New York Federal Reserve building in Manhattan, they managed to steal $100 million via cyber SWIFT codes before allegedly laundering it through three Filipino casinos.

    On February 5, hackers looted the Central Bank of Bangladesh’s Federal Reserve Account, stored in Manhattan, by scheduling a $100 million wire transfer through the Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunications network (SWIFT).

    What happened next depends on who you believe.

    The general understanding, however, is that the funds were promptly delivered from the Federal Reserve to Philippines bank Rizal Commercial Banking Corporation (RCBC), and then distributed through a black market foreign exchange broker, before being laundered internationally through at least three casinos.

    New York Federal Reserve boss William Dudley said no compromise was experienced on his end, and that the responsibility needs to be placed on SWIFT.

    “The payment instructions were fully authenticated by the SWIFT messaging system in accordance with standard authentication protocols,” Dudley spokeswoman Andrea Priest said in a press release.

    Bangladesh authorities argue otherwise. “We kept money with the Federal Reserve Bank and irregularities must be with the people who handle the funds there,” Bangladesh Finance Minister Abul Maal Abdul Muhith explained to Bloomberg News.

    Swift Action

    Muhith told reporters on Tuesday that his country will take legal action to recoup the stolen funds, but didn’t go so far as to threaten an actual lawsuit against the NY branch (there are 12 in all) of the American federal banking system. Now more than a month since the alleged theft, and no party has yet taken the blame, to no one’s surprise given the potential legal repercussions.

    Belgian-based SWIFT said it wouldn’t comment on individual cases, but did say that it authenticates “between sending and receiving institutions” before approving any transaction.

    RCBC has also denied involvement, saying that it doesn’t work with gambling enterprises. The bank did confirm an $81 million deposit was completed through one of its branches and that its investigations division is probing the transfer.

    Back in the US, the Fed says it’s working with the Bangladesh Central Bank, but retains its position that there’s no evidence the country’s account was breached.

    The Federal Reserve in Manhattan provides banking accounts and transaction services for some 250 foreign countries. Bangladesh’s foreign currency reserve balance is currently around $27 billion.

    More Safeguards Needed

    While a $100 million transfer at your local community bank would certainly raise plenty of eyebrows, it likely didn’t cause much suspicion at the NY Federal Reserve, where more than $2.6 trillion in assets is (supposed to be) safeguarded.

    Assuming the Bangladesh heist was indeed performed by criminals and not an inside job, the robbery should emphasize the continued need to create more sophisticated cyber safeguards. The largest Federal Reserve in the United States being so easily compromised is surely reason for much concern for just about everybody.

    In fact, other federal institutions are taking proactive measures to better defend their operations online. Earlier this month, the Pentagon invited vetted hackers to try and infiltrate its private network and public websites.

    “Hack the Pentagon” is a bounty competition where approved hackers are rewarded for infiltrating and exposing areas prone to intrusion.

    “I am confident that this innovative initiative will strengthen our digital defenses and ultimately enhance our national security,” US Defense Secretary Ash Carter said of the certainly unusual, but apparently much-needed, program.

    Offline alrelax

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    Re: Scandals--Frauds--Criminals--Gangsters
    « Reply #20 on: December 17, 2016, 11:06:10 am »
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  • Post #18:

    Lots of regulatory action the past couple of years in Southern California.  I also recall the Lucky Lady not being so lucky with raids and closures. 

    FBI Swoops in on Two San Diego Card Rooms, Indicts 25 in Huge Illegal Gambling Ring

    First Published: December 10, 2015

    San Diego Card Clubs Raided by FBI

    Harvey Souza (center), owner of the Seven Mile Club, in happier times. The club was allegedly used as a conduit for money-laundering by a Mob-affiliated gambling ring.

    The FBI raided two San Diego card rooms on Wednesday, moving in for what the Bureau alleges is the casinos’ role in a massive illegal gambling operation.

    Palomar Card Club on El Cajon Boulevard in San Diego and the Seven Mile Casino on Bay Boulevard in Chula Vista are accused of being the conduit through which the operation’s dirty money was laundered.

    At the head of the ring was bookmaker and alleged Philadelphia Mob associate David “Fat Dave” Stroj, who, according to court documents, made $500,000 a month from illegal gambling activities that included sports betting and the organization of high stakes poker games. The operation handled around $2 million per month, the documents said.

    Stroj is alleged to have had more than 360 clients on his books, with operations spanning from California to Florida, and from Canada down to Mexico.

    Dirty Laundry

    In all, 25 people were arrested along with Stroj in the raid, including the owner of the Seven Mile Casino, Harvey Souza, and one of the owners of Palomar Card Club, Naseem “Nick” Salem.

    Because casinos have traditionally been targets for criminals looking to launder money, they have, since the passage of the Money Laundering Control Act of 1986, been required to file a Casino Transaction Report to the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) for any currency transaction over $10,000.

    However, the indictment alleges that Palomar, specifically, was not merely guilty of negligence, but of deliberately turning a blind eye to transactions and therefore of actively conspiring with the gambling ring.

    So while the Seven Mile is simply charged with not having sufficient anti-money-laundering measures in place, the Palomar is charged with conspiracy to money launder.

    “They were not duped. It was criminal in nature,” said Assistant US Attorney Joshua Mellor of the Palomar  Card Club’s involvement.

    Condemned by Wiretaps

    According to court documents, FBI wiretaps recorded Stroj explaining how he was able to launder money through the card clubs.

    “Palomar is the best way I can wash the money,” he is reported to have said. “I don’t have to report it. I just deposit it at the Palomar, and there’s no problem for me.”

    Prosecutors also said that Stroj had laundered money through the Bellagio and Wynn in Las Vegas, although neither casino is named in the indictment.

    Both of the San Diego casinos have been in trouble with regulators before. Earlier this year, the California Gambling Control Commission accused the owners of the Palomar Club, Donald and Susan Staats, of transferring its ownership to an unlicensed operator, their daughter.

    Souza was castigated by regulators in September for failing to disclose a $3 million loan that he had used to build the Seven Mile.

    Both properties have been closed down and will remain so until they are able to demonstrate they are able to operate in accordance with their licensing requirements.

    Offline alrelax

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    Re: Scandals--Frauds--Criminals--Gangsters
    « Reply #21 on: December 17, 2016, 11:15:09 am »
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  • Post #19:

    Seriously??  Is this the most laughable criminal collusion since Tom and Jerry??  I read this, bear in mind I used to play at Mohegan Sun when I lived in the northeast.  I just made a cup of coffee and had my triple iced vanilla doughnut with holiday peppermint filling when I laughed so darn hard the coffee came out my nose and onto the doughnut!!!!  LOL!  

    OMG, clowns of the year awards they deserve, gave the money to the dealer on the floor???  WTF?

    Mohegan Sun Blackjack Dealer Accused of Chip-Passing Scam


    First Published: December 04, 2015

    Mohegan Sun blackjack dealer charged
    A Mohegan Sun blackjack dealer allegedly tried to get back at his employers by going in cahoots with a player. Both have now been accused of conspiring to rob the casino.

    A disgruntled Mohegan Sun blackjack dealer stands accused of passing $78,390 in chips to a player-accomplice.

    It’s alleged that Roy Mariano, 52, of New London, Connecticut, passed blackjack chips worth $100 each that were hidden in stacks of lower denomination red chips to Marlene Rivera of Southbridge, Massachusetts during 16 different blackjack sessions in August of this year. Both have been charged with first-degree larceny.

    Mariano admitted to police that he had a grudge against his employers. The dealer, who had worked at the casino since it first opened in 1996, was upset that management had reduced his role from full-time to part-time. He is handicapped and needed the money, he said, as recorded in court documents.

    Conflicting Accounts

    Mariano claims that he was approached in May or June by Rivera, who had told him she could help him out with money. He began giving her extra chips each time he paid her winnings, and she would hand him his cut as he walked from the table to the break room. He claimed he couldn’t remember how much money he had received from Rivera.

    Despite the apparent confession, the dealer’s lawyer entered a plea of not guilty to the charge of first-degree larceny for his client, which comes with a maximum sentence of 20 years in prison.

    Rivera, 36, a mother of seven, tells a different story.

    She said that Mariano approached her boyfriend, and that the two had concocted the scheme together. The boyfriend played several times, she claims, and he and Mariano allegedly split the winnings 50-50. When she later began playing too, Mariano also gave her half the winnings, the woman added.

    Police said they suspected that Rivera, who has yet to enter a plea, was being deceptive during her interview.

    Facebook Gloating

    Rivera’s Facebook page records several winning visits to an unnamed casino in August, followed by a vacation to Las Vegas in September. The August social media posts include messages like:

    “Great night at cino”

    “Casino night again$$$”

    “Whacha think Joe… a car? Lol monneeyyy…cha-ching!!”

    While the scheme eluded supervisors on duty, it was eventually picked up by the eye-in-the-sky. The Mohegan Tribal Police began examining surveillance footage on September 1st at the request of Tribal Gaming Commissioner Robert Bjork.

    As well as hiding $100 chips in stacks of five-dollar ones, it also showed Mariano hiding one $100 chip beneath a card used to cut the deck before passing it to Rivera.

    Mariano and Rivera were arrested at the table

    Offline alrelax

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    Re: Scandals--Frauds--Criminals--Gangsters
    « Reply #22 on: December 20, 2016, 05:49:01 pm »
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  • Post #20:

    Unbelievable.....Go Macau----Go!  It all goes hand in hand, this is gambling greed to the fullest.

    Fake VIP Room Hoax Henchmen Sentenced in Macau

    First Published: April 12, 2013

    How-to-Become-the-Best-Craps-Player-Craps-Betting-and-EtiquetteSixteen individuals, arrested last year, have been sentenced by Macau’s Court of First Instance for their involvement in running a twisted VIP room hoax in a Cotai luxury hotel room last year.

    The Macau Post reported that the sixteen arrestees were actually operating as part of a larger criminal syndicate. It reported that the syndicate duped individuals, primarily high rollers from the mainland, into playing in one of their VIP rooms, which turned out to be simply luxury hotel presidential and corporate suites which were transformed into believable VIP rooms, completely fooling the punters who thought they were getting the full treatment on behalf of the hotel.

    Drugs and Sedatives Found

    Around $12.5 million worth of betting chips were seized during the arrest last year by the local authorities, along with numerous gambling and non-gambling paraphernalia, such as collapsible baccarat gaming tables, small amounts of drugs and sedatives, and other gaming equipment used in the illegal operation.

    Two Year Operation Alleged

    However, one of the most shocking revelations of the entire operation was the local enforcement’s suggestion that the VIP scam had been going on for almost two years, duping a large number of unsuspecting punters into thinking they were being treated to extra special, VIP treatment. They also noted that the planning that went into the scam was of a very high caliber, as in addition to transforming the hotel rooms into fake VIP rooms and casinos, the group also used stooges to pose as dealers, security guards, public relations managers, and even other players. This really was a well-planned operation, albeit illegal and morally bankrupt.

    But painting a seedier picture of the syndicate and its operations, there are allegations that drinks were spiked with drugs, and fake shuffling occurred to ensure the unsuspecting players just didn’t stand a chance in the fake casino lounge.

    But those who get greedy eventually get caught by the law, and it was only a matter of time until the syndicate got caught carrying out their scam. However, although they may have scammed many unsuspecting victims out of their hard-earned cash and made them forever wary of any special treatment, the perpetrators (one from Macau, and fifteen from mainland China) now face a sentence anywhere between 18 months to three years. And there won’t be any VIP rooms where they’re going, either.

    Offline alrelax

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    Re: Scandals--Frauds--Criminals--Gangsters
    « Reply #23 on: December 20, 2016, 05:53:47 pm »
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  • Post #21:

    The Mafia, once again and once again on-line gaming.

    Mafia Grandfathers Busted on Online Gambling Charges

    First Published: December 19, 2016

    A group of ageing Genovese Mafia fossils were indicted in New York on Thursday on charges related to the operation of 4spades.org online sportsbook, as well as loan sharking and bootlegging.

    Among the 13 arrested as a result of a long-running investigation, dubbed “Operation Shark Bait,” was Salvatore “Sallie” DeMeo, 76, of America’s Most Wanted fame. DeMeo starred in the show in 1999 when he was wanted for robbing a bank and ripping off an armored car in Manalapan, New Jersey.

    Mafia Online Gambling Operation Busted
    The Grandfathers: An alleged and aged illegal bookmaking and loan-sharking operation was smashed by New York police on Thursday.

    DeMeo, a made-man in the Genovese family, finally surrendered to authorities in 2001 and was released from prison in 2006.

    He was the alleged ringleader of this creaking group of wise-guys, which authorities say handled millions in bets through a wire room in Costa Rica.

    Has Mafia Infiltrated Price-per-head Bookmaking?

    4spades.org is a “price-per-head” bookmaking site. These typically use agent-bookmakers, who give customers user-names and passwords to access the site and place bets. No financial transactions are made online; instead, details of bets are stored and tracked on the site, while collections and payouts are made in person, by the agents.

    It’s not the first price-per-head operation to be linked to the Genovese family in recent years. In 2014, 13 people with links to the family, including alleged capo Joseph Lascala, were imprisoned for their links to the operation of BetEagle.com, also based in Costa Rica.

    In that case, the court heard customers unable or unwilling to pay debts would be met with threats and intimidation and forced to pay interest on top of the original sum owed.

    “Despite these Genovese members’ continued attempts to evade detection, our investigation revealed millions in offshore sports betting, lucrative loan sharking, and tax evasion,” said New York City Police Commissioner James O’Neill, of the most recent arrests.

    “These defendants allegedly went to great lengths to trap their victims with exorbitant rates, all while evading our gambling laws and taking offshore bets,” said New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman. “No matter how complex or clever the scheme, we will continue to work with our law enforcement partners to take down traditional organized crime.”

    Rational Alternative

    Ironically, a New York Times article in 2012, examining the pay-per-head bookmaking trend, declared that such businesses “attract an increasingly diverse customer base, with demographics far beyond the stereotypical image of the mob-connected bookie.”

    A recent study by the American Gaming Association found that, of 40 federal gambling convictions throughout 2014, a quarter of all cases were linked to organized crime gangs.

    The organization has called for “a rational alternative” to the US sports betting status quo, a prohibition that provides a steady revenue stream for organized crime.

    Offline alrelax

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    Re: Scandals--Frauds--Criminals--Gangsters
    « Reply #24 on: January 26, 2017, 09:44:49 am »
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  • Post #22:

    Former USC football player Owen Hanson is looking at 20 years in prison after confessing to running an illegal offshore gambling operation that also sold narcotics and performance-enhancing drugs to athletes.

    Owen Hanson USC gambling drugs
    Owen Hanson, a former USC tight end football player, has pled guilty to running an illegal narcotics and offshore gambling network. (Image: USC/KTLA)

    The 34-year-old admitted this week to being the leader of ODOG Enterprises, an alleged violent operation that sold numerous criminal narcotics including cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine, and ecstasy. Hanson’s associates also dealt metabolic steroids to professional athletes according to the US Department of Justice.

    A Southern California native, Hanson’s ODOG Enterprises was based out of Peru and Central America. The DOJ says Hanson’s company routinely “used threats and violence against its gambling and drug customers to force compliance.”

    Though he’s facing at least 20 years behind bars, US Magistrate Judge Mitchell Dembin said the Southern District of California Court could extend the sentencing to life considering the transactional volume of narcotics Hanson facilitated.

    Hanson was a member of the 2004 USC Trojans football team that won the National Championship. However, the title was vacated after an NCAA investigation discovered improper gifts were given to star running back Reggie Bush by sports agents.

    Plea Rescinded

    It’s only been a matter of days since Hanson entered his guilty plea, but writing from jail, he now says he was the victim of baiting by law enforcement agents.

    In a letter to VICE Sports, the former football player says, “The new plea they made me sign in court yesterday will not stand. They added a mandatory minimum I never agreed to and was pressured to sign it without reviewing with my family. It was a travesty of justice, protocol and trust.”

    Hanson’s demise came at the hands of Robert “RJ” Cipriani, a professional gambler who in 2011 accepted $1.5 million in dirty money, allegedly unbeknownst to him, to play with at a Sydney casino. RJ then sent his winnings to the ringleader in the form of a check, a classic example of money laundering.

    Cipriani says he later found out that Hanson’s activities were unlawful, and tipped police. His mother’s gravesite was than splashed in red paint in what was deemed to be a threat on the gambler’s life.

    A total of 22 defendants have been charged in the ODOG operation. Sixteen have already pled guilty to their charges.

    Athletes and Gambling

    Hanson is of course not the first former athlete to get tied up in gambling, and he certainly won’t be the last.

    After leaving USC as a national champion, Hanson dabbled in real estate before venturing into the illicit world of drugs and offshore gambling.

    However, many athletes are after the thrill of the wager, and not necessarily the potential monetary gain. Names like Pete Rose, Alex Rodriguez, and Michael Jordan didn’t gamble heavily because they needed money.

    Research over the past two decades has drastically improved the neurological understanding of how the brain responds to gambling, and how it changes when the mind becomes addicted. Studies have found that pathological gamblers and drug addicts share similar thrill seeking needs and reward.

    When the rush of competing in front of thousands of fans is gone, some athletes turn to new vices. Unfortunately for Hanson, when he’s sentenced later this year, his will likely put him in prison until at least 2036.

    Offline alrelax

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    Re: Scandals--Frauds--Criminals--Gangsters
    « Reply #25 on: January 26, 2017, 09:47:46 am »
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  • Post #23:

    Anthony Murgio, the operator of Bitcoin exchange Coin.mx, pled guilty this week to one count each of conspiracy to operate an unlicensed money transmitting business, conspiracy to commit bank fraud, and conspiracy to obstruct an examination of a financial institution. If convicted, he could face up to 30 years in prison.

    Coin.mx Anthony Murgio pleads guilty
    While Anthony Murgio (seen here in August 2015, after being charged in federal court) was the main operator of Coin.mx, it’s believed the business was owned by Gery Shalon, who is accused of orchestrating a massive cyber-attack on JPMorgan, among other targets. (Image: Michael Appleton/The New York Times)

    The announcement of the plea came from US Attorney for the Southern District of New York Preet Bharara. Once up for consideration for US Attorney General, Bharara has a tough reputation for taking plenty of prisoners when it comes to prosecuting criminal enterprises.

    Coin.mx was operational between 2013 and 2015, before it was shut down by the FBI, following a joint investigation with the US Secret Service. A federal indictment accuses the operators of knowingly facilitating the exchange cash for Bitcoins by criminal groups.

    Transactions related to cases of computer hacking, securities and wire fraud, identity theft, illegal internet gambling, and money laundering were all processed by the site, claim prosecutors. Coin.mx also allegedly helped victims of ransomware attacks transfer cash into the digital currency, without reporting the suspicious transactions to authorities.

    JPMorgan Hack Attack

    Murgio is accused of going to great lengths to conceal the operation from authorities, hiding the business behind several fake fronts, including one called “Collectables Club.” This was an attempt to fool financial institutions into believing it was an online club for stamp collectors and hobbyists.


    While Murgio ran the show, with the help of co-defendant Yuri Lebodev, prosecutors believe the site was actually owned by Gery Shalon, an Israeli accused of being the mastermind behind a massive cyber-attack on JPMorgan in the summer of 2014. That hack resulted in the largest-ever theft of customer data from a US financial institution, affecting some 83 million customers, including both individual accounts and those of small businesses.

    Shalon was extradited from Israel to the US last year. Along with two others, he is alleged to have operated a criminal enterprise that also involved with pumping up stock prices with sham promotional emails, running illegal online casinos, and laundering money through at least 75 shell companies around the world.

     $10 Million in Illegal Bitcoin Transactions

    It’s unclear how well Murgio knew Shalon, and he is not believed to have had direct involvement in the JPMorgan attack. But his former school friend Joshua Aaron is accused of being a member of Shalon’s hacking group. Aaron was arrested in Russia in October and turned up in the US in December to face trial.

    “Anthony Murgio took a new-age approach to an age-old crime of fraud. As he admitted in his guilty plea today, Murgio used Coin.mx, an internet-based Bitcoin exchange, to process over $10 million in Bitcoin transactions in violation of federal anti-money laundering laws, and then obstructed a regulatory examination to hide his scheme,” Bharara said in an issued presser on Monday on the matter.

    Murgio will be sentenced on January 27.

    Offline alrelax

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    Re: Scandals--Frauds--Criminals--Gangsters
    « Reply #26 on: January 26, 2017, 09:50:13 am »
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  • Post #24:

    Carl Icahn to Surrender Trump Taj Mahal License, Will Not Reopen Atlantic City Casino

    Unofficial Donald Trump regulatory advisor Carl Icahn will surrender the casino license for the Trump Taj Mahal in Atlantic City, according to the New Jersey Division of Gaming Enforcement (DGE).

    Carl Icahn surrendering Trump Taj Mahal gaming license
    Billionaire Carl Icahn was not bluffing when he threatened to close the Taj Mahal in Atlantic City for good, nor does he intend to reopen it as a non-unionized property, per a filing with the New Jersey regulator. (Image: Chip East/Bloomberg via Getty)

    Icahn shuttered the Taj in October, following months of industrial action by Local 54 of the Unite-HERE union. The union was protesting the loss of worker pensions and healthcare benefits, but Icahn Enterprises said the casino was losing millions of dollars a month.

    He blamed that reality on the union’s picket lines outside the casino, and said the company could “no longer see a path to profitability.”

    The DGE said on Tuesday that Icahn Enterprises had petitioned the regulator for permission to give up its license on December 22. The announcement puts to bed the suspicion, widely held within the union, that Icahn shuttered the Taj so that he could then reopen it as a non-unionized business.

    According to the Associated Press, Icahn Enterprises said in the DGE filing that it had complied with all regulations on “securing unopened liquor, gambling equipment and business records; [had] made provisions to pay off unclaimed casino winnings; and [had] reduced its security staffing to ‘warehouse mode.’”

    Deed Restriction on Casino Reopening

    In December, the New Jersey legislature passed a bill designed to punish Icahn for closing the Taj and to prevent him from reopening it: now a moot point.

    The bill, introduced by Democratic Senate President Steve Sweeney, seeks to disqualify operators from holding a casino license for a property they have closed. It has yet to be signed into law by Governor Chris Christie, who has the power to veto the measure.

    Icahn Enterprises has also applied to the state Superior Court for a deed restriction prohibiting any future owner from reopening the property as a casino, unless an unspecified fee is paid.

    Checkered History

    The Trump Taj Mahal opened 1990 at a cost of $1 billion and was promptly declared the “eighth wonder of the world” by the current president-elect. It was bankrupt a year later, and then again in 2004, and 2009, when Trump sold the casino to a group of venture capitalists, who collectively became known as Trump Entertainment.

    Icahn, the holder of the majority of the Taj’s debt, stepped in to rescue the casino from the brink when Trump Entertainment declared bankruptcy in 2014. He said he would convert the debt into equity and invest in the beleaguered property, but only if the city granted him the right to put a temporary halt on workers’ benefits, causing the union uproar to ignite.

    Offline alrelax

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    Re: Scandals--Frauds--Criminals--Gangsters
    « Reply #27 on: January 26, 2017, 09:53:05 am »
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  • Post #25:

    Gaming Cybercrime 2016
    The code for the Mirai botnet was posted publicly online in October, giving hackers access to the most powerful DDoS attack ever recorded. (Image: Shutterstock.com)

    The online gambling industry has been a target for cyber criminals since the early days of the industry. The reliance of sports books on major sporting events for a major chunk of their revenues gives hackers a handy roadmap for extortion.

    Take down a bookmaker’s site during the soccer World Cup, for example, or during the biggest race meet of the year, and the chances are it will pay a ransom demand if its internal security team or the company that hosts its servers can’t repel the attack.

    Hackers generally use distributed denial of service attacks (DDoS) to disrupt the services of online gambling sites. DDoS attacks flood a targeted website with thousands of meaningless requests in order to overload the systems and render it non-operational.

    As attacks become more sophisticated over time, so must efforts to counter them as security firms strive to stay a step ahead of cyber criminals.

    This is why the emergence in 2016 of the Mirai botnet was a real cause for concern for online gambling sites.

    Mother of all DDoS Attacks

    Mirai can be described as the “mother of all DDoS attacks.” It first surfaced in mid-September and began launching attacks far beyond the scale and sophistication than anything we had seen before.

    Mirai is able to harness the power of thousands of Internet of Things (IoT) devices, focusing them on a central server (botnet) to boost the power of an attack. And worryingly, the source of the code was posted publicly online on a hackers’ forum in early October.     

    Sure enough, within weeks, the William Hill website became the first reported victim of the Mirai botnet within the industry. On November 2, the company said that its website had been knocked offline “intermittently” for around 24 hours, although customers reported that the outage appeared to last over three days, suggesting Hills was having a harder time battling the botnet that it was willing to let on.“

    But all this extortion and ransoming seems petty in comparison with the biggest gaming-related cybercrime of the year, which must also be one of the biggest cybercrimes ever.

    Fed Bank Heist

    On February 5, hackers flooded the Federal Bank of New York with requests for transfers totaling almost $1 billion from an account owned by the Bangladesh Bank and used by the government of Bangladesh.

    Around $101 million was successfully withdrawn before suspicions were raised. Some $20 million of the stolen money was quickly traced to Sri Lanka and recovered. The rest was transferred to Philippine bank RCBC, and from there $46 million found its way into the lightly regulated Philippine casino industry where much of it disappeared.

    Casinos in the Philippines are not beholden to anti-money laundering laws, which means makes the funds difficult to trace, and the incident has provoked calls inside the country for tighter regulation of the industry.

    Some $15 million was traced, however, to accounts owned by Kim Wong, president of the Eastern Hawaii Casino in the Cagayan Economic Zone, who said he had received the money from two high rolling junket operators who owed him money.

    Speculation as to the perpetrator of the crime ranges from Wong himself to the North Korean government, although, at the time of writing, no arrests have been made and the case remains a mystery.

    Offline alrelax

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    Offline alrelax

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    Re: Scandals--Frauds--Criminals--Gangsters
    « Reply #29 on: March 10, 2017, 08:20:57 am »
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  • Off the subject of casino/gaming scams and crimes. 

    How unintelligent can you be today with Face Book and social media?  Seriously??

    The Gingerbread Man.  "Catch me if you can, I'm too quick for you".  Seriously, dubs himself the Gingerbread Man, LOL. The guy committed numerous robberies and break in's.  Baffled the police.  Finally someone alerted the cops to the posting on a Face Book page and read something along the lines of , "Catch me if you can", etc.  One thing led to another and IP address found out.  There are cops out there like Kojack, LOL. 

    The guy is in jail with a cell mate probably named, "Humpty Dumpty".  Congrats to the smart young crowd boasting of their crimes on social media!