08 Online Gambling Ban Bill Makes Its Way Through US Congress

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Offline NewsBot

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Offline ThomasGrant

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Re: Online Gambling Ban Bill Makes Its Way Through US Congress
« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2014, 02:13:43 pm »
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  • Land of the FREE... NOT...
    Its reminds me of those hey days of prohibition.
    Make something illegal.
    And whatever it is.
    Finds its way underground.
    Onto the black market.
    Fortunately most European countries are far more intelligent that what the US is.
    They just tax the frak out of Alcohol and other drugs.


    Offline esoito

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    Re: Online Gambling Ban Bill Makes Its Way Through US Congress
    « Reply #2 on: April 05, 2014, 11:23:16 pm »
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  • Hopefully none of the US members here will choose to be offended by the "intelligent" comment!

    Thomas, it's always risky criticising another country on a forum in those sorts of terms. That's always best done privately!


    Offline Xander

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    Re: Online Gambling Ban Bill Makes Its Way Through US Congress
    « Reply #3 on: April 05, 2014, 11:59:46 pm »
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  • Quote
    Its reminds me of those hey days of prohibition.
    Make something illegal.
    And whatever it is.
    Finds its way underground.
    Onto the black market.
    Fortunately most European countries are far more intelligent that what the US is.
    They just tax the frak out of Alcohol and other drugs.-Thomas Grant



    Thomas Grant,

    Here's a little history for you on prohibition:

    Czech Republic[edit]

    On 14 September 2012, the government of the Czech Republic banned all sales of liquor with more than 20% alcohol. From this date on it was illegal to sell (and/or offer for sale) such alcoholic beverages in shops, supermarkets, bars, restaurants, gas stations, e-shops etc. This measure was taken in response to the wave of methanol poisoning cases resulting in the deaths of 18 people in the Czech Republic.[10] Since the beginning of the "methanol affair" the total number of deaths has increased to 25. The ban was to be valid until further notice,[11] though restrictions were eased towards the end of September.[12] The last bans on Czech alcohol with regard to the poisoning cases were lifted on 10 October 2012, when neighbouring Slovakia and Poland allowed its import once again.[13]

    Nordic countries[edit]

    The Nordic countries, with the exception of Denmark, have had a strong temperance movement since the late 1800s, closely linked to the Christian revival movement of the late 19th century, but also to several worker organisations. As an example, in 1910 the temperance organisations in Sweden had some 330,000 members,[14] which was 6% of a population of 5.5 million.[15] Naturally, this heavily influenced the decisions of Nordic politicians in the early 20th century.

    Already in 1907, the Faroe Islands passed a law prohibiting all sale of alcohol, which was in force until 1992. However, very restricted private importation from Denmark was allowed from 1928.

    In 1914, Sweden put in place a rationing system, the Bratt System, in force until 1955. However a referendum in 1922 rejected an attempt to enforce total prohibition.

    In 1915, Iceland instituted total prohibition. The ban for wine and spirits was lifted in 1935, but beer remained prohibited until 1989.

    In 1916, Norway prohibited distilled beverages, and in 1917 the prohibition was extended to also include fortified wine and beer. The wine and beer ban was lifted in 1923, and in 1927 the ban of distilled beverages was also lifted.

    In 1919, Finland enacted prohibition, as one of the first acts after independence from the Russian Empire. Four previous attempts to institute prohibition in the early 20th century had failed due to opposition from the tsar. After a development similar to the one in the United States during its prohibition, with large-scale smuggling and increasing violence and crime rates, public opinion turned against the prohibition, and after a national referendum where 70% voted for a repeal of the law, prohibition was ended in early 1932.[16][17]

    Today, all Nordic countries (with the exception of Denmark) continue to have strict controls on the sale of alcohol which is highly taxed (dutied) to the public. There are government monopolies in place for selling spirits, wine and stronger beers in Norway (Vinmonopolet), Sweden (Systembolaget), Iceland (Vínbúðin), the Faroe Islands (Rúsdrekkasøla landsins) and Finland (Alko). Bars and restaurants may, however, import alcoholic beverages directly or through other companies.

    See also: Alcoholic beverages in Sweden and Algoth Niska

    Greenland, which is part of the kingdom of Denmark does not share its easier controls on the sale of alcohol.[18]

    Soviet Union[edit]

    Main article: Prohibition in Russian Empire and Soviet Union

    In the Russian Empire, a limited version of a Dry Law was introduced in 1914.[19] It continued through the turmoil of the Russian Revolution of 1917 and the Russian Civil War into the period of Soviet Russia and the Soviet Union until 1925.

    United Kingdom[edit]

    Although the sale or consumption of commercial alcohol has never been prohibited by law, historically various groups in the UK have campaigned for the prohibition of alcohol, including the Society of Friends (Quakers), The Methodist Church and other non-conformist Christians, as well as temperance movements such as Band of Hope and temperance Chartist movements of the 19th century.

    In 1853, inspired by the Maine law in the USA, the United Kingdom Alliance led by John Bartholomew Gough was formed aimed at promoting a similar law prohibiting the sale of alcohol in the UK. This hard-line group of prohibitionists was opposed by other temperance organisations who preferred moral persuasion to a legal ban. This division in the ranks limited the effectiveness of the temperance movement as a whole. The impotence of legislation in this field was demonstrated when the Sale of Beer Act 1854 which restricted Sunday opening hours had to be repealed, following widespread rioting. In 1859 a prototype prohibition bill was overwhelmingly defeated in the House of Commons.[20]


    -------------------

    In the US, we've been slow on the online gambling because there's so much corruption abroad within the online gambling community.  Dr. Elliot Jacobson, and others have documented several incidents. 


    Offline Xander

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    Re: Online Gambling Ban Bill Makes Its Way Through US Congress
    « Reply #4 on: April 06, 2014, 12:09:08 am »
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    Let me point this out.
    YOU DO NOT NEED TO HAVE REFERRALS..
    As for the Matrix.
    The upgrade just puts you into the matrix.
    It really is there for the food run for the kids.
    You can make money in WWS with out SPONSORING a single soul.
    All you have to do. Is purchase Life Jackets.
    Make 5% gratitude tokens a week.
    5% on your money.
    Is better than any bank out there.
    WWSz is a REAL business.
    With Real products.
    Up to you if you wish to do it or not.

    You can read about it in the MMG forum.
    http://www.moneymakergroup.com/Worldwidesolutionz-Worl-t437266.html&st=3120 -Thomas Grant's gypsy scam



    Thomas Grant,

    I recently helped bail out a Nigerian prince.  I'm expecting his wire transfer for several million to come in any day now.  So, I'll be buying those life jackets real soon!   :cheer: :cheer: :cheer:



    -Xander